Moped-share company Revel building car charging hub in NYC

February 8, 2021

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — The moped-sharing company Revel says it is building a charging hub for electric vehicles in Brooklyn this spring. Revel officials say the charging facility will be the first in a network of car-charging hubs planned for New York City. The initial charging hub will be located at the site of the former Pfizer building in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn and will have 30 stations capable of delivering 100 miles of charge to vehicles in about 20 minutes. The charging stations will be available 24 hours a day to drivers of any type of electric vehicle.last_img

Utah theme park sues Taylor Swift over ‘Evermore’ album

February 8, 2021

first_imgSALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A theme park in Utah has filed a lawsuit against Taylor Swift that accuses her of trademark infringement. Evermore Parks said in its suit filed Tuesday that the title of Swift’s 2020 album “Evermore” violates the park’s trademark rights. Swift’s lawyers say the allegations are baseless and they refuse to comply with a cease and desist letter the park sent to Swift on Dec. 18. They added that the singer-songwriter styled her new album in a way that is entirely distinct from the park’s aesthetic. Evermore Park was created in 2018 and features costumed actors and performers.last_img

Student hits building, flees scene

January 26, 2021

first_imgPolice arrested a Notre Dame senior Saturday night when he crashed his truck into a vacant building at a South Bend intersection and then fled the scene of the accident. Sgt. James Walsh from the South Bend Police Department said the crash occurred around 10 p.m. at the intersection of Eddy Street and South Bend Avenue. “The driver overcorrected on his turn and drove into the building,” Walsh said. Walsh said none of the evidence points to intoxication as a factor in the accident. The student left his car and returned home. Walsh said the building was structurally sound before the crash and is now “very unstable and dangerous.” Police arrested the student at his off-campus home about an hour after the crash for leaving the scene of an accident causing property damage. He spent several hours in the St. Joseph County Jail on Sunday morning. Walsh predicted the student would face a misdemeanor charge from the St. Joseph Country Prosecutor’s Office in the next few days. The Observer is withholding the student’s identity because he has not yet been formally charged with a crime.last_img read more

Making the cut

January 26, 2021

first_imgAs colleges compete for top national rankings and students compete for top SAT scores, some people argue the college admissions process places too much focus on numbers. Don Bishop, associate vice president for Undergraduate Enrollment, said test scores do not fully reflect the attributes of a school or an applicant, especially at Notre Dame. “Colleges are accused by families as using the SAT too much to value students in the admissions selection process,” Bishop said. “Well, the colleges are concerned that students and their families use the rankings too much to value the colleges. There’s kind of a balanced equation, there, of discomfort in the process.” Bishop said an applicant’s exam performance is extremely important, but more weight is placed on class performance than on standardized test scores during the decision process. “People are concerned we use [test scores] too much, we would disagree with that,” he said. “The admissions office would be as poorly served if all we used were SAT scores. If we started being guilty of what the public thinks we do and we overused the numbers, we would have an inferior student body.” Bishop said along with academic excellence, Notre Dame emphasizes personal qualities in an applicant, including intellectual curiosity, creativity, critical thinking and leadership. “We are not going to become more generic in our selection process to get higher ranked,” he said. “What’s interesting is the more we stay Notre Dame at the core, the more successful we’ll be at raising the profile of the class.” Bishop said he wishes students and their parents viewed college rankings the same way Notre Dame Admissions views standardized test scores ⎯ in the context of other qualities. “Do you assume that the values that the U.S. News & World Report or other ranking organizations … are the same as yours, as a consumer?” Bishop said. “I would suggest … your ranking might put more emphasis on certain things.” He said students’ overuse of rankings to determine whether a college is a match shows a lack of sophistication. “There’s a certain sort of disease in this of, ‘No matter what I have, it’s not as good as what I want to have,’” Bishop said. “People have just lost their sense of perspective.” Those numbers should instead be used to help students identify a neighborhood of colleges to look into, Bishop added. “Whether somebody is ranked sixth or third or tenth or fifteenth, you need to put that away and go visit the campus, go to their website, talk to their alumni,” he said. “Do your due diligence of other fact-finding.” Bishop said Notre Dame’s ranking as number 19 in the 2012 U.S. News & World Report’s list of best national universities does keep the quality of applicants consistently high. The ranking reassures the public that Notre Dame is a top choice, he said. He said the University has especially benefited from the Mendoza College of Business’s number one ranking by Bloomberg Businessweek. “We have seen a disproportionate raise in applications over the last couple years because of that number one ranking,” Bishop said. “Notre Dame’s business school was always ranked in the top five and usually in the top three, but being number one has a cache that captures the imagination and the confidence of the public in a unique way.” Bishop said national rankings are subjective and did not accurately represent the quality of a university since ratings are calculated according to an algorithm. “Notre Dame has been consistently ranked in the top 20, but if you look at the academic profile of the freshman class, it’s actually higher than that,” he said. “If you look at the graduation rate we’re in the top three, if you look at the percentage of alumni giving we’re in the top three, if you look at our endowment for national private research universities we’re tenth … So actually top 20 is a lower rank than what our reality is, depending on what you value.” Over the next few admissions cycles, Bishop said, Notre Dame will reach out more aggressively to top students across the country. He said this initiative is not a criticism of what Notre Dame has done so far, but there exists an opportunity to do more. “Obviously, we’re doing a pretty good job,” he said. “We’re going to ambitiously think of how to [increase] that … I don’t think we’ve done enough yet as a University as successful as we have been.” For many applicants, Notre Dame is set apart by its Catholic social teaching, sense of community and strength of its alumni network, he said. “If students value our religious affiliation and our commitment to Catholic social teaching, what other school would rank with us? Notre Dame is considered by many as a unique choice,” Bishop said. “We are not generically a top-20 or top-10 highly selective school ⎯ we are more than that due to our focus as a Catholic University.”,As colleges compete for top national rankings and students compete for top SAT scores, some people argue the college admissions process places too much focus on numbers. Don Bishop, associate vice president for Undergraduate Enrollment, said test scores do not fully reflect the attributes of a school or an applicant, especially at Notre Dame. “Colleges are accused by families as using the SAT too much to value students in the admissions selection process,” Bishop said. “Well, the colleges are concerned that students and their families use the rankings too much to value the colleges. There’s kind of a balanced equation, there, of discomfort in the process.” Bishop said an applicant’s exam performance is extremely important, but more weight is placed on class performance than on standardized test scores during the decision process. “People are concerned we use [test scores] too much, we would disagree with that,” he said. “The admissions office would be as poorly served if all we used were SAT scores. If we started being guilty of what the public thinks we do and we overused the numbers, we would have an inferior student body.” Bishop said along with academic excellence, Notre Dame emphasizes personal qualities in an applicant, including intellectual curiosity, creativity, critical thinking and leadership. “We are not going to become more generic in our selection process to get higher ranked,” he said. “What’s interesting is the more we stay Notre Dame at the core, the more successful we’ll be at raising the profile of the class.” Bishop said he wishes students and their parents viewed college rankings the same way Notre Dame Admissions views standardized test scores ⎯ in the context of other qualities. “Do you assume that the values that the U.S. News & World Report or other ranking organizations … are the same as yours, as a consumer?” Bishop said. “I would suggest … your ranking might put more emphasis on certain things.” He said students’ overuse of rankings to determine whether a college is a match shows a lack of sophistication. “There’s a certain sort of disease in this of, ‘No matter what I have, it’s not as good as what I want to have,’” Bishop said. “People have just lost their sense of perspective.” Those numbers should instead be used to help students identify a neighborhood of colleges to look into, Bishop added. “Whether somebody is ranked sixth or third or tenth or fifteenth, you need to put that away and go visit the campus, go to their website, talk to their alumni,” he said. “Do your due diligence of other fact-finding.” Bishop said Notre Dame’s ranking as number 19 in the 2012 U.S. News & World Report’s list of best national universities does keep the quality of applicants consistently high. The ranking reassures the public that Notre Dame is a top choice, he said. He said the University has especially benefited from the Mendoza College of Business’s number one ranking by Bloomberg Businessweek. “We have seen a disproportionate raise in applications over the last couple years because of that number one ranking,” Bishop said. “Notre Dame’s business school was always ranked in the top five and usually in the top three, but being number one has a cache that captures the imagination and the confidence of the public in a unique way.” Bishop said national rankings are subjective and did not accurately represent the quality of a university since ratings are calculated according to an algorithm. “Notre Dame has been consistently ranked in the top 20, but if you look at the academic profile of the freshman class, it’s actually higher than that,” he said. “If you look at the graduation rate we’re in the top three, if you look at the percentage of alumni giving we’re in the top three, if you look at our endowment for national private research universities we’re tenth … So actually top 20 is a lower rank than what our reality is, depending on what you value.” Over the next few admissions cycles, Bishop said, Notre Dame will reach out more aggressively to top students across the country. He said this initiative is not a criticism of what Notre Dame has done so far, but there exists an opportunity to do more. “Obviously, we’re doing a pretty good job,” he said. “We’re going to ambitiously think of how to [increase] that … I don’t think we’ve done enough yet as a University as successful as we have been.” For many applicants, Notre Dame is set apart by its Catholic social teaching, sense of community and strength of its alumni network, he said. “If students value our religious affiliation and our commitment to Catholic social teaching, what other school would rank with us? Notre Dame is considered by many as a unique choice,” Bishop said. “We are not generically a top-20 or top-10 highly selective school ⎯ we are more than that due to our focus as a Catholic University.”last_img read more

Registry collects samples

January 26, 2021

first_imgHoward Hall and Morrissey Hall will hold a bone marrow drive today in LaFortune’s Dooley Room with Be the Match Registry, an organization in charge of the national bone marrow registry. Event organizer Sarah Calahan said the drive promotes the dedication Notre Dame students have to service. “We do so much service here to help people and improve the world – this is just another powerful way for you to save a life,” Calahan said. “It’s a great cause to get involved with so come on by for a free bro tank, free food and to save a life.” Calahan said participants’ DNA samples are registered in the national registry after a sample is taken. “All you have to do is take a glorified Q-tip [and] swab your cheek. If you are matched to a patient, then you can choose to donate your marrow,” said Sarah, “It is serious if you are called [because] you could save a person’s life.” This year, the drive chose senior Bridget Dillon and sophomore Scott Dawson as its two spokespeople from the Notre Dame community. Dillon donated bone marrow last year to a pediatric patient. “I was sitting in my best friend’s dorm room when I received a call that I was a possible match for a nine-year old girl with aplastic anemia,” Dillon said. Calahan said though Dillon signed up for the registry during her sophomore year, she was chosen later because bone marrow matches are very rare. “Out of the 500 people that register every year, Bridget was the only one who was requested to donate her marrow,” said Sarah. Dawson said he was on the other side of the donation process. He said he had leukemia and got a bone marrow transplant during his sophomore year. “I underwent four rounds of chemotherapy and thankfully have been cancer-free since,” Scott said. “Although I don’t need a transplant at this time, leukemia patients like me rely on generosity of donors through the Be The Match Registry to beat this disease.” Calahan said technological improvements have made bone marrow transplants easier to perform than in the past. “Bone marrow transplants are not as medically serious now as they were. 75 percent of the bone marrow transplants are non-invasive [and] performed non-surgically,” she said. “Blood is drawn from one arm, it is filtered and then put back into the other arm.” Dillon said her transplant was surgically harvested. This exception was made since she was donating to a pediatric patient. “Bone marrow transplants that were done surgically from the hip bone used to happen within families because no one wanted to go through so much pain for a stranger,” she said. “But now it is relatively simpler and so it is easier to save lives.”last_img read more

MLK honored at SMC dinner

January 26, 2021

first_imgWhile the nation formally celebrated Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday, Saint Mary’s will honor the civil rights leader tonight at the second annual MLK Commemorative Dinner. The dinner culminates the College’s week of celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Senior and Student Diversity Ambassador Elizabeth Elsbach said the dinner’s theme, “Diversity Beneath the Skin,” encourages people to see through constructs that limit their interactions with others. “Prejudice and intolerance go deeper than skin color and we wanted to highlight how we can help eliminate some of the prejudice in society by looking beyond the surface,” she said. “This year’s theme highlights how socioeconomic differences and other factors can be just as devastating and aid in creating a society that denies people their full potential.” Assistant Director of Multicultural Services Tamara Taylor said College President Carol Ann Mooney’s strategic plan inspired the theme. The theme enables the College community to “look at the students on campus who are not immediately [seen as diverse] and what they bring to campus,” Taylor said. Mooney and senior London Lamar will be keynote speakers at the dinner, which is sponsored by Student Involvement and Multicultural Services and the Sisters of Nefertiti club. Elsbach and sophomore Dara Marquez will also read poetry. Elsbach won Saint Mary’s Martin Luther King Jr. Peace Prize competition last year for her poem titled “Painting Empty,” which is about dispelling prejudices and misconceptions. “[It’s] about first looking inward to dismantle personal prejudices before looking outward to tackle problems in the world,” Elsbach said. The poem Elsbach will read at this year’s dinner expresses how people are both different and similar, she said. “This year’s poem will be about a long past great-great-grandmother conversing with her descendant and the recognition that they have nothing in common,” Elsbach said. “Despite that, they still recognize each other’s humanity. I think they are important because they showcase an emotional, human element that is behind every great cause.” Elsbach said celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. Day is vital. “I think it is important for people to take time to remember and reflect on how far we’ve come in our fight against prejudice and recognize how far we still have to go,” she said.last_img read more

Saint Mary’s to host Junior Moms Weekend

January 26, 2021

first_imgThere will be an extra 400 women roaming around Saint Mary’s College campus this weekend, as junior moms from all across the country come to visit their daughters.Juniors Michelle Lester and Kassandra Acosta, class of 2022 council representatives, are in charge of planning this year’s Junior Mom’s weekend event with help from executive administrative assistant of student affairs Noelle Warren and vice president of student affairs Karen Johnson.“This weekend is important because it gives the Belles of the junior class a chance to spend a special weekend with their loved ones as we end our junior year,” Lester said. “It is also a great way for us to thank our loved ones for everything they have done for us throughout our lives and especially their help in us attending Saint Mary’s.”Lester said this year, they are making specialized shirts that read, “I’ll love you forever, I’ll like you for always, as long as I’m living, together we’ll be,” and wine glasses with the words “Together we’ll be,” referencing the famous children’s book, “Love You Forever” by Robert Munsch. They will also host a garden dedication ceremony.“We will all gather at Riedinger House to dedicate a garden we have donated on behalf of the class of 2020 and our moms [and] mother figures,” Lester said. “It is a beautiful garden on the right side of the lawn in front of the house.”Lester said they will host an opening reception Friday. Moms and daughters will have the opportunity to practice yoga in Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex, attend Mass in the Church of the Lady of Lorretto and go to a silent auction at the Hilton Garden Inn over the course of the weekend.“All proceeds from the silent auction go to help offset the costs of the Class of 2020’s Senior Week next year,” Lester said.Lester said moms and daughters also have free entry to the Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex along with tickets to Saint Mary’s production of the play, “Proof.”Junior Kellen Hinchey said her mom is traveling from the suburbs of Chicago to spend some quality time with her daughter.“I am most looking forward having my mom here all weekend, being able to introduce her a lot of my friends and getting her more involved in the SMC community,” Hinchey said.Hinchey said she and her mom decided to participate in most of the pre-planned activities but will also spend time together on their own shopping or getting their nails done.“I hope to spend quality time with my mom this weekend and show her what a Saint Mary’s woman is all about,” Hinchey said. “We didn’t know anyone who went to SMC before I started school here, so we are learning a lot of the SMC traditions together.”Tags: Community, Junior Moms Weekend, moms and daughterslast_img read more

State Police Plan Body Camera Pilot Program, Official Says

January 18, 2021

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Photo: VIEVU / YouTubeALBANY — New York State Police say they plan to go forward with a body camera pilot program for state troopers, a move that would change the agency’s status as one of the few primary state law enforcement agencies in the nation without body or dashboard cameras.Kevin Bruen, first deputy superintendent of the New York State Police, disclosed the plan for a pilot program Monday at the state Capitol. He did not provide details of the plan, such as how many troopers will receive the devices and how much money the pilot program might cost.His comments come months after a nationwide Associated Press survey found that New York State Police are the country’s largest primary state law enforcement agency not equipped with body or dashboard cameras.Without operating those devices, New York State Police continue to remain an anomaly compared to police forces in large cities and state police agencies across the U.S., the Associated Press survey found. Many primary state-level policing agencies do not operate body cameras, but do use dashboard cameras.Patrol cameras are regularly praised by law enforcement experts as ways to increase transparency and hold officers and citizens accountable.Equipping state police with body cameras has received support from New York Attorney General Letitia James. Some state lawmakers have also expressed support for bringing the technology to the agency.New York State Police has said it once had VHS cameras and later digital cameras on a limited number of vehicles. But, according to the agency, it did not have the money to continue the VHS cameras and the digital cameras required “costly maintenance.”last_img read more

Daniel Radcliffe on the Emma Watson Prank That Made His Lip Quiver

January 18, 2021

first_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on July 20, 2014 Star Files The Cripple of Inishmaan star Daniel Radcliffe stopped by Live with Kelly and Michael to discuss his greatest fear is about doing a show on the Great White Way. The Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner also shared a peek at his luscious locks for his upcoming film Frankenstein, and Rippa commented that he “would be a very beautiful woman.” Well, Radcliffe, if you’re on board, we have one (or two) shows in mind you could step into after Inishmaan! That’s after he adds Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead and Company to his resume, both of which he expressed interest in doing while speaking to The New York Times. Daniel Radcliffe The Cripple of Inishmaan View Commentslast_img read more

Annette Bening, Jessica Hecht & Jessica Collins Will Join John Lithgow in Lear

January 18, 2021

first_img John Lithgow King Lear will feature scenic design by John Lee Beatty, costume design by Susan Hilferty, lighting design by Jeff Croiter, sound design by ACME Sound Partners and original music by Dan Moses Schreier. Hecht received a Tony nomination for her performance in the recent revival of A View From the Bridge. She has also appeared on Broadway in The Assembled Parties, Harvey, Brighton Beach Memoirs, Julius Caesar, After The Fall and The Last Night of Ballyhoo. Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 17, 2014 In addition to Lithgow as Lear, Bening as Goneril, Hecht as Regan and Collins as Cordelia, the cast will include Jeremy Bobb as Oswald, Steven Boyer as Fool, Glenn Fleshler as Cornwall, Slate Holmgren as the King of France, Christopher Innvar as Albany, Chukwudi Iwuji as Edgar, Clarke Peters as Gloucester, Dale Place as Old Man and Curan, Jay O. Sanders as Kent and Eric Sheffer Stevens as Edmund. The non-equity ensemble will include Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Andrew Burnap, Christopher Ghaffari, Ryan-James Hatanaka, Matt Helm, Dave Klasko and Phillip Shinn. Collins’ stage credits include Les Liaisons Dangereuses on Broadway, as well as We Live Here and Manic Flight Recation. Star Filescenter_img View Comments The speculation was true! Annette Bening, along with Jessica Hecht and Jessica Collins, will play the daughters of the previously announced John Lithgow in the Public Theater’s Shakespeare in the Park production of King Lear. Tony winner Daniel Sullivan will direct the Shakespeare classic about a King who loses everything after disowning his favorite daughter. The play will run from July 22 through August 17 at the Delacorte Theater with opening night set for August 5. Bening earned a Tony nod for her performance in Coastal Disturbances. She has also appeared on stage in Medea and The Female of the Species. She received Oscar nominations for her roles in the films The Kids Are All Right, Being Julia, American Beauty and The Grifters. King Lear Related Showslast_img read more