BC wildlife tour company charged after allegedly luring bears with food

October 17, 2019

first_imgBLUE RIVER, B.C. – A wildlife tour company in Blue River, B.C., is facing charges for allegedly putting food out to attract bears.Chris Doyle, deputy chief of the B.C. Conservation Officer Service, said in a conference call Thursday that the service began its investigation last August after receiving a complaint.Doyle said charges were sworn in May against Blue River Safari, also known as River Safari, which offers jet boat and jeep tours for bear and wildlife viewing.He said the charges against the company include feeding dangerous wildlife and placing attractants for dangerous wildlife under the B.C. Wildlife Act.The allegations have not been proven in court and the company could not immediately be reached for comment.Doyle said a representative for Blue River Safari is expected to appear in a Clearwater court on Sept. 25.Blue River is near Wells Grey Provincial Park, about 80 kilometres from the Alberta boundary.Doyle said it’s much more common for people to unintentionally leave out attractants for bears than to feed them on purpose, but it can have the same effect of putting both human safety and the lives of bears in danger.last_img read more

Humboldt officials share lessons from overwhelming hours days after crash

October 17, 2019

first_imgWINNIPEG – The manager of a Saskatchewan city that lost 16 people in a hockey team bus crash says community officials everywhere need to be trained in how to deal with trauma and mental-health needs following a disaster.Joe Day says he only had limited training in how to respond to an emergency when he was called last spring following the deadly crash that would reshape the city of Humboldt.A semi-trailer and a bus carrying the city’s junior hockey team collided in April. Sixteen people died and 13 were injured.“We train for events like train derailments or big automobile accidents, but we don’t do a lot of training for what happens if there is a big mental-health type of issue in your community,” Day said at a disaster management conference in Winnipeg on Wednesday.Day first heard about the collision on social media. A call from Nipawin’s mayor followed soon after and officials quickly assembled in Humboldt to figure out what happened, how bad the crash was and what the community’s response should be.“It was completely overwhelming how many moving parts there were in the first two, 2 1/2 days,” Day said.“It was necessary for such broader, bigger trauma counselling and trauma response that we really weren’t prepared with how to deal with that.”Humboldt fire Chief Mike Kwasnica told the conference he received a phone call from Nipawin’s fire chief soon after the crash. Humboldt’s volunteer firefighters were 170 kilometres away from the site so their roles as first responders changed drastically.They were often a shoulder to cry on or directed traffic on top of responding to their regular calls for fires and car crashes.“I don’t know if you can plan for it,”said Kwasnica, who added that the crash affected some firefighters directly because they had billeted players in the past.It soon became clear that Humboldt would become a place to mourn, but unlike a forest fire or a flood, the province didn’t have mental-health professionals who could respond at a moment’s notice, Day said.Workers from local non-governmental organizations volunteered their time and spent days at the Elgar Petersen Arena, which became the gathering centre for people grieving.The Sunday following the crash thousands of people crowded into the area for a vigil that was broadcast around the world.Day said the grief didn’t end after the vigil or when the media coverage of the tragedy began to wane. For the families affected and for people in the community, mental-health supports were needed long after.Officials in Humboldt are involved in a review with Public Safety Canada and Day said it’s important they reflect on the steps taken in the moments, days and weeks after the fatal crash.“This is an event that for us isn’t over,” Day said.“We went through a lot. We learned a lot.”last_img read more

Calgary joins rotating Canada Post strikes

October 17, 2019

first_imgCALGARY (660 NEWS) – Calgary employees were ordered to walk off the job at 6 p.m. Wednesday night as part of the Canada Post rotating strikes.The Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW) made the announcement over its website earlier in the day to report to their locals along with members from Kelowna and Toronto.The move comes after the federal government had named a special mediator earlier in the day in hopes of ending this job action.“There will be no delivery of mail or parcels or pick-ups,” said Canada Post spokesperson Jon Hamilton. “There will likely be pickets set up at our facilities, the rest of our network will remain open but we’ll wait to see where they shut down but you can count on the mail processing facility, the depot, and the post offices.”Hamilton says service will resume as soon as the workers return to the job after that 24 hour period.“Negotiations continue, we have a good offer on the table with wage increases, benefit improvements, job security and no concessions or rollbacks whatsoever,” he said. “Rotating strikes are having an impact on our customers, we’re trying to do everything we can to minimize them and catch up once they end but it is an inconvenience for our customers and we’re doing our best to reduce that inconvenience.”The union has several things it says it wants to be addressed, including job security through the creation of full-time positions.They also want issues addressed concerning parcel deliveries and health concerns around what it deems as precarious work.“We never know, hopefully, it’ll be over soon,” said Casey Hutsul from the picket line. “It’s dead, maybe it’ll last a couple days we’re hoping.”“We’re trying to get the employer to negotiate,” said Anna Beale, Executive Vice-President of the Calgary local of the Candian Union of Postal Workers. “And they just seem to have, I don’t know if it’s come to a standstill or they want someone else to push them but we’re here to say we want you to negotiate properly and fairly.”Beale says they are in favour of the increased workload they’re seeing with parcel delivery but it has to be done safely.“We’re also looking at making it a better pay equity system … we’re trying to get it so whoever does the same work gets the same pay.”Canada Post has warned customers there could be delays as these walkouts continue.CUPW represents 50,000 employees nationwide.last_img read more

Commons committee to weigh probe of SNCLavalin allegations

October 17, 2019

first_imgOTTAWA — The SNC-Lavalin controversy shifts today to the House of Commons justice committee, where MPs will decide whether to investigate allegations of undue political arm-twisting.Jody Wilson-Raybould resigned from the federal cabinet Tuesday, leaving fresh unanswered questions about whether Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s aides pressured her to help engineering firm SNC-Lavalin avoid criminal prosecution.Trudeau has denied Wilson-Raybould was pressured to instruct the director of public prosecutions to negotiate a remediation agreement with SNC-Lavalin rather than pursue a criminal trial on charges of bribery and fraud related to the company’s efforts to secure government contracts in Libya.The governing Liberals, who hold the majority on the Commons committee, appear to be open to conducting an investigation.NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh warns that if the Liberals shut the committee’s work down, it would send a dangerous signal to Canadians about the state of their democracy.Federal ethics commissioner Mario Dion has initiated his own investigation into the matter, specifically whether there’s been a violation of the Conflict of Interest Act.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Mulroney memoirs tell different story about interference with AG on Milgaard case

October 17, 2019

first_imgJoan Bryden, The Canadian Press OTTAWA — Jody Wilson-Raybould approvingly points to Brian Mulroney as a prime minister who knew better than to politically interfere with the judgment of his attorney general when it comes to criminal prosecutions.But the former justice minister evidently didn’t read Mulroney’s memoirs, in which the former Conservative leader proudly recounts how he ordered his attorney general to refer a controversial murder case to the Supreme Court of Canada.That attorney general was Kim Campbell who, according to Mulroney, did as she was told in the case of David Milgaard, who was wrongly imprisoned for 23 years for a murder he did not commit. She went on to become prime minister.Mulroney’s memoirs flatly contradict the version of events cited by Campbell in her own memoirs and repeated by Wilson-Raybould in a written submission last week to the House of Commons justice committee. The submission was intended to bolster her contention that she faced inappropriate pressure last fall from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his top aides and others to stop the criminal prosecution of Montreal engineering giant SNC-Lavalin.As part of her submission, Wilson-Raybould included transcripts of text messages she exchanged with her chief of staff, Jessica Prince, following a Dec. 18 meeting with Trudeau’s chief of staff, Katie Telford, and principal secretary Gerald Butts.Prince relates that the duo tried to persuade her that Wilson-Raybould should seek advice from a retired Supreme Court justice as to whether she could review a decision by the director of public prosecutions, who had refused to negotiate a remediation agreement with SNC-Lavalin rather than pursue prosecution on bribery charges related to contracts in Libya. Prince says she repeatedly told Telford and Butts that would amount to “interference.”In the course of that discussion, Prince says Butts raised the Milgaard case.“Gerry told some story about how Mulroney met with David Milgaard’s mom, walked into the cab(inet) room and told Kim Campbell she had to fix it. She gave him all these AG reasons why she couldn’t interfere but then she ultimately did what Mulroney wanted and was right,” Prince says.After asking for more details about the reference to Milgaard, Wilson-Raybould then asks Prince to send her Campbell’s cell phone number, commenting “Good grief — this is absurd.”Wilson-Raybould met with Campbell the following day at a Vancouver coffee shop.“Needless to say, she categorically denied what Mr. Butts had said and was quite offended and outraged by the comments. She adamantly denied the characterization not only of her as the attorney general but of her former boss, Prime Minister Mulroney,” Wilson-Raybould wrote in her submission.“She further reflected — as she did in her memoirs (1996) — that Brian Mulroney ‘was much too good a lawyer to intervene improperly in the matter. He never breathed a word about the Milgaard case to his AG, nor did anyone in his office ever attempt to influence her handling of the case.’”Wilson-Raybould did not mention that Campbell also wrote in her memoirs that Mulroney had “blindsided” her by meeting with Milgaard’s mother, Joyce, in 1991. She wrote that she was assured the two discussed only Milgaard’s living conditions in prison and not his application for a review of his conviction for the 1969 rape and murder of a Saskatoon nursing student, which Campbell had rejected.Nevertheless, Campbell termed it an “inappropriate intervention” and suggested it was politically motivated. She wrote that Mulroney’s chief of staff, Hugh Segal, told the British Columbia Conservative caucus that the prime minister’s meeting with Joyce Milgaard was “brilliant” and the kind of thing he needed to do more to burnish his image in the run-up to the 1993 election.Nor did Wilson-Raybould mention, or appear aware of the fact, that Mulroney completely contradicted Campbell’s version of events in his own memoirs, published in 2007.He recounted how he was “disturbed” by the way in which Campbell had “brushed off” Joyce Milgaard, having told her during a public encounter: “Madam, if you wish to have your son’s case dealt with fairly, please do not approach me.” He was “privately furious with her” for rejecting Milgaard’s application for a review of his case.Mulroney provided a condensed transcript of his meeting in Winnipeg with Joyce Milgaard, during which he said he was “extremely prudent” in his choice of words because he knew they were being recorded. At one point, he told her that Campbell is going to look at “new information that’s come in” and that he’s going to be talking to her when he gets back to Ottawa about her son’s case.When he got back, Mulroney wrote, he had Campbell summoned to his parliamentary office where, “because of the sensitivity of the matter, I met with her alone.”“‘The matter has been reviewed by the department and I have conveyed our decision,’ she told me.“‘Kim,’ I answered, ‘that is not acceptable to me. The law provides for a reference to the Supreme Court and it is my intention to ensure that this case is in fact referred to the Supreme Court.’“My tone was firm and my words unequivocal. She understood and changed her tack quickly.“‘Prime Minister,’ she answered, ‘If this is the case, may I make the announcement myself?’”The top court ultimately recommended Milgaard’s conviction be set aside. Campbell ordered a new trial but the government of Saskatchewan refused to do so, issued a stay of proceedings and freed Milgaard in 1992. Five years later, DNA evidence from the victim’s clothes cleared Milgaard and led to the arrest and eventual conviction of serial rapist Larry Fisher.Butts and the top public servant, Michael Wernick, have testified that no improper pressure was exerted on Wilson-Raybould over the SNC-Lavalin case. They have maintained they only wanted her to get a second opinion on the advisability of overriding the public prosecutor’s decision, as allowed by law.Wilson-Raybould’s written submission, released Friday, supplements her nearly four hours of oral testimony last month. She believes she was moved out of her dual role as justice minister and attorney general to Veterans affairs in a mid-January cabinet shuffle as punishment for refusing to intervene in the SNC case. She resigned from cabinet a month later.last_img read more

In the news today April 12

October 17, 2019

first_imgFive stories in the news for Friday, April 12———CARBON TAX DEBATE FOGGED BY MYTHS: ECONOMISTA carbon tax doesn’t work says the head of Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission, which is a non-partisan group of academics and business leaders focused on economic and environmental solutions. Chris Ragan says between politicians who fog the truth and the ones just in a fog — a carbon tax debate is clouding Alberta’s provincial election and drifting into an upcoming federal campaign. He says there’s a bunch of stuff out there that is either misunderstanding or poorly explained. And there a bunch of myths out there, he adds. The commission has just published a report on carbon tax misconceptions.———911 DISPATCH SYSTEM CHANGE FRUSTRATES FIRE CHIEFA 911 dispatch system in British Columbia is getting a starkly different review from firefighters and paramedics responding to medical emergencies. Fire Chief Nick Delmonico of the Port Coquitlam Fire Department says the so-called clinical response model adopted in B.C. last May has put patient safety at risk because firefighters are no longer routinely being dispatched to medical calls along with paramedics. He says firefighters provide comfort and care to patients before an ambulance arrives but now they’re sometimes not being called even when they’re supposed to be, such as when paramedics don’t show up for 10 minutes.———CANADIANS DIVIDED ON HANDGUN BAN: REPORTIt appears there is no clear answer on whether Canadians are in favour of banning handguns and assault-style firearms. Following a shooting spree in Toronto last summer, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau asked Crime Reduction Minister Bill Blair to study the possibility of such a ban. A report released Thursday found opinions expressed during in-person discussions and through written submissions both opposed and supported a ban. But when participants responded to a questionnaire, the majority were against the idea.———PUSH RCMP ON STERILIZATION PROBES: NDP MPNDP MP Don Davies says Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale should use all “legitimate tools” at his disposal to ensure the RCMP investigates women’s allegations of forced or coerced sterilizations. In a March letter to Davies, after he called for a criminal probe of coerced sterilizations, especially of Indigenous women, RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki said the force will work with commanding officers in each province and territory to see if any complaints have been reported and will reach out to other Canadian police agencies as well. But, Lucki wrote, a preliminary review of the RCMP’s national database found no records of specific complaints to pursue. So Davies has written to the minister who oversees the police force.———CRITICS SAY PESTICIDE PLAN IS ‘NONSENSICAL’Environment groups are calling out Canada’s approach to assessing pesticides after seven years of reviews led Health Canada to simultaneously decide to allow certain popular products to keep being used with restrictions, and to propose banning the same products from outdoor uses altogether. The Pest Management Regulatory Agency on Thursday released its final decision on what limits should be placed on a category of nicotine-based pesticides known as neonicotinoids to keep them from killing bees. Starting in two years, the pesticides won’t be allowed to be sprayed at all on certain crops like apples and tree nuts and there will be limited times when they can be sprayed on many others, like tomatoes, eggplants and berries.———ALSO IN THE NEWS:— Prime Minister Justin Trudeau delivers remarks to supporters at the 2019 convention of the Liberal Party of Canada in Ontario. Note: Media must arrive no later than 7 p.m. local time.— Liberals from across Ontario gather for the 2019 convention of the Liberal Party of Canada in Ontario. Justin Trudeau will make remarks at the convention on Friday, April 12.— The Central Okanagan Regional District hosts a Facebook live demo on what to include in an emergency kit in case of flooding, wildfires and other emergencies.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Trudeau pledges more funding for reproductive health services worldwide

October 17, 2019

first_imgOTTAWA — The Liberal government says it will increase Canadian funding for women’s health worldwide to $1.4 billion every year starting in 2023, with half of this money dedicated to sexual- and reproductive-health rights.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made the funding commitment in Vancouver today at a major global conference on gender equality.He says Canada will step up and invest in respecting women’s rights while other countries are stepping back and playing politics with the issue.Trudeau has been vocal in criticizing what he called a “backsliding” on women’s rights in some American states that are severely restricting or outright banning abortion.Currently, Canada spends $1.1 billion on women’s health services worldwide, with $400 million dedicated to sexual and reproductive health.Trudeau says Canada will gradually increase the total amount to reach $1.4 billion by 2023, with $700 million of this money spent on ensuring women have access to safe abortions and reproductive-health services worldwide.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Son lacked oxygen for 8 12 minutes after paramedics took over father

October 17, 2019

first_imgLETHBRIDGE, Alta. — A father on trial in his son’s death suggested Wednesday that he and his wife would have been better off going directly to hospital rather than handing the child over to an ambulance.David and Collet Stephan are charged with failing to provide the necessaries of life to their boy Ezekiel in 2012. The 19-month-old died of bacterial meningitis seven years ago.His parents had treated him with herbal and alternative remedies before they sought medical attention.Court has heard the couple made two 911 calls on March 13, 2012. The first was when Ezekiel had stopped breathing, but he seemed to recover, so David Stephan turned down an offer for an ambulance.Within the hour, the Stephans were on the phone with a dispatcher again as they drove from their southern Alberta home near Glenwood to meet an ambulance on the highway.David Stephan, who is representing himself in court, spent hours cross-examining paramedic Ken Cherniawsky, who met the Stephans while they were on the way to the nearest hospital in Cardston.Cherniawsky testified Tuesday that the ambulance wasn’t properly equipped with either the right-sized valve mask or endotracheal tube for a patient of Ezekiel’s age.“Yesterday it was identified it was approximately 8 1/2 minutes without oxygen whatsoever. No chest rise. No chest fall. Correct?” Stephan asked Wednesday.“Yes,” Cherniawsky replied.“Would it have been better to have just kept on driving to hospital with Collet doing the CPR than for him to end up in an ambulance and go 8 1/2 minutes without oxygen?” said Stephan.“No. If a patient, regardless of whether it’s a pediatric or an adult, if they’re in cardiac arrest, the evidence-based, definitive treatment which proves to have the most success is defibrillation … and the ambulance had the equipment available,” said Cherniawsky.He said there was no chance of it working on the toddler because he had already flatlined.Cherniawsky also told the court that there was no damage done to Ezekiel from the time he was received into care and taken to hospital.Earlier this week, naturopath Tracy Tannis and friend Terrie Shaw testified that they suggested the parents take their son to see a doctor when he failed to recover from what the family thought was the flu.Two protesters were standing outside court in Lethbridge, Alta., early Wednesday. Dr. Bill Shields, a urologist, was holding a sign that read “Ezekiel Had A Right to a Life” while his wife Roberta’s placard read “Health Care Is Not Evil.”“I don’t believe how they treated their child is anywhere near (how) I would or anyone I know would have treated a child that sick,” said Shields.David Stephan said outside court that it hurts to hear public criticism and “to have salt rubbed in the wound on a regular basis.”It is the second trial for the Stephans, who now live in Grande Prairie, Alta. A jury found them guilty in 2016, but the Supreme Court overturned the convictions last year and ordered a new trial.— Follow @BillGraveland on TwitterBill Graveland, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Chief military judge testifying in own court martial

October 17, 2019

first_imgOTTAWA — Canada’s chief military judge is in the witness box during his own court martial, where he is speaking about his personal and professional relationship with his deputy — who is the presiding judge for his trial.The surreal scene is the latest twist in an unprecedented legal case, in which Col. Mario Dutil is facing eight charges, including two of fraud and four of violating the military’s code of conduct.The relationship between Dutil and deputy chief military judge Louis-Vincent d’Auteuil has figured prominently through the first two days of the court martial thanks to a motion for d’Auteuil to recuse himself from the case.Dutil’s lawyer asked d’Auteuil, who appointed himself to hear the case, to step away.Philippe-Luc Boutin says d’Auteuil is too intertwined in the case because of his ties to the chief military judge and his previous knowledge of the some of the allegations, and that it perhaps should have been sent to the civilian system.Military prosecutors, however, are defending the decision to try Dutil via court martial, saying several of the charges are not in the Criminal Code but fall exclusively under military law.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

BC man who jumped naked into Toronto shark tank says hed do

October 17, 2019

first_imgA British Columbia man apologized to a judge on Thursday for stripping naked and jumping into a shark tank at a Toronto aquarium last year only to moments later say outside court that he did not regret his actions.David Weaver, of Nelson, B.C., was drunk when he went to Ripley’s Aquarium in downtown Toronto on Oct. 12, bought a ticket, then stripped naked and jumped into the facility’s shark tank, court heard.“I just want to take the time to apologize for wasting your time your honour, the court’s time, and for my actions of last year,” Weaver said to the judge after pleading guilty to one count of mischief.But after court, Weaver said he was not inebriated, he just had “a couple of drinks.”“I’d do it again,” a smiling Weaver told reporters.He will serve a 12-month suspended sentence, must attend counselling and cannot return to Ripley’s.The prosecutor admonished Weaver for his actions that night.“His behaviour was more than foolhardy, it was criminal,” said Crown attorney Heather Keating. “There is no other explanation other than attention seeking.”Court heard Weaver, 38, has a criminal record and has struggled with alcohol abuse for the past two decades ever since his brother murdered his father when he was only 15 years old.The murder had a major effect on Weaver’s life, his lawyer Blair Drummie told court.“That was part of why he’s acted out in the past,” he said as Weaver looked down at a paper clip he fiddled with.Weaver never sought counselling for his father’s death, Drummie said.About 18 years ago, Weaver moved to B.C., where he worked at various times as a firefighter, tree planter and most recently as a fishing guide on the Pacific Ocean, his lawyer said. He has been seeing a counsellor since jumping into the shark tank.Drummie said his client is not an animal activist, but “he just doesn’t like seeing animals in cages.”“That in combination with excess alcohol is the main reason as to why (he did it.)”Ripley’s declined to comment on the guilty plea. The aquarium previously told The Canadian Press that its surveillance footage showed a man and a woman buy tickets to the event at 10 p.m. and made their way directly to the “dangerous lagoon,” the 2.9 million-litre tank that is the centrepiece of the tourist attraction.The park said the man jumped into the pool at 10:26 p.m.“You can see Mr. Weaver is naked, but you can also see he is fairly unfazed by his behaviour,” the Crown lawyer said as she played a video in court of Weaver swimming naked in the pool. There was a large crowd gathered near the main lagoon as part of a regular “jazz night.” It was one of the videos captured by those in attendance, the Crown said.Weaver swam around the tank and at one point, at the urging of security guards, climbed out of the tank before performing a back dive into the water to loud cheers from the crowd.Sand tiger sharks, sawfish, moray eels and turtles swam in the massive lagoon, Keating said.After five minutes, Weaver got out of the water, grabbed his clothes and left.“He jeopardized the health and safety of animals in the tank who are in a highly controlled marine environment,” she said. “He shocked and in some cases frightened visitors, who included young children, worried about the sharks.”Police arrived within seven minutes, Ripley’s previously said, but by then Weaver and the woman were long gone.The Crown noted the infamy related to the actions that were captured on video and made news around the world.Weaver was arrested four days later near Thunder Bay, Ont., during a vehicle stop and spent three nights in jail, court heard.Drummie said Weaver has been working hard to make amends over the past year, including a $500 donation to the World Wildlife Fund.Police have also alleged that earlier that night Weaver assaulted a man outside Medieval Times, a jousting-themed dinner theatre. A window was also allegedly broken.Weaver was charged with assault and mischief in that earlier incident, which is now being dealt with separately by the court.He is scheduled to face trial on those charges next month.last_img read more

Elton John Visits Philippines With Starkey Hearing Foundation

October 16, 2019

first_imgStarkey Hearing Foundation wrapped up their second mission to the Philippines last week with help from legendary singer-songwriter, Sir Elton John and David Furnish.Elton John, David Furnish and Starkey Hearing Foundation founders Bill and Tani Austin help a young man hear during the Foundation’s mission in ManilaJohn and Furnish joined the Foundation in Manila and helped fit more than 400 hearing aids to children and adults in need, allowing many to hear for the first time in their lives.In 2004 and 2009, John was the headlining performer at the Foundation’s annual So The World May Hear Awards Gala, and he and Furnish have supported Starkey Hearing Foundation’s work for several years since then. This was their first opportunity personally participate in a mission and give the gift of hearing.“We are working to create peace and understanding around the world through the gift of hearing, and it is not possible without all the efforts of our friends and partners,” said Bill Austin, Founder of Starkey Hearing Foundation. “We are so honored to have the support of Sir Elton John and David Furnish and that they would take the time to help us deliver this precious gift.”Starkey Hearing Foundation was also in the Philippines last December, delivering the gift of hearing to nearly 1,400 people in Manila, Bohol and Cebu with help from professional boxer, Manny Pacquiao and Los Angeles Galaxy soccer player, Landon Donovan. The Foundation plans to return in March 2013 to fit approximately 7,500 hearing aids in Manila, Batangas and General Santos.This Philippines mission was the conclusion of a major mission circuit for Starkey Hearing Foundation. The team visited 13 additional cities in five countries—Senegal, Ghana, Nigeria, Liberia and India—and distributed more than 24,000 hearing aids over six weeks.Starkey Hearing Foundation conducts approximately 70 missions each year, both domestically and internationally. Hearing missions are the primary way the Foundation realizes its goal – So the World May Hear. Starkey Hearing Foundation continues to fulfill its Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) commitment to provide more than 100,000 hearing aids to people in need each year and more than one million this decade.According to Starkey Hearing Foundation, hearing loss is pervasive, affecting 34 million Americans – or one in 10. Yet, with the help of a hearing device, hearing loss can often be corrected in a majority cases, giving an individual the opportunity to better connect with their family, the community and the world around them.Source:PR Newswirelast_img read more

Common Ground Foundation Celebrates An Evening Of Glory

October 16, 2019

first_imgOver the weekend, the Common Ground Foundation celebrated Oscar winner, activist, and musician Common at Perillo Rolls Royce in Chicago.The star studded gala and fundraiser featured a special performance from Common and John Legend of the Oscar-winning original song ” Glory” from Selma, along with a celebrity appearance from Matt Forte of the Chicago Bears. Funds raised at the gala supported Common’s organization The Common Ground Foundation.“I started the Common Ground Foundation because I wanted to help,” said Common. “Most of all help people to help themselves. I always believed that if we started with the youth then we would be planting the seeds for our future to blossom. Give the children a sense of hope, self-esteem, and love that will better the world… I think making a difference in the lives of others is life’s greatest purpose. I walk this path with faith knowing that the Common Ground Foundation will Change the World.”The Common Ground Foundation serves youth ages 13-17 from Chicago’s South and West Side communities. The organization focuses on character development, creative expression, nutrition, and money management. The organization helps youth find their voice and make positive contributions to society.Visit The Common Ground Foundation website to learn more.Copyright ©2015Look to the Starslast_img read more

Maroon 5s James Valentine And Martin Guitar Raise Awareness Of Forest Sustainability

October 16, 2019

first_imgTo raise awareness of the importance of sustainable wood sourcing, Martin Guitar has announced it is teaming up with the Rainforest Alliance on a public engagement campaign, #FollowTheFrog.The multi-phase campaign, which launched this week, will use Martin’s social media platforms, Martin Ambassador James Valentine of Maroon 5, and public events to drive attention to Martin’s longstanding commitment to the environment and its collaboration with the Rainforest Alliance for over two decades to protect precious forests through the practices of responsible forest management.The multi-faceted Martin Guitar activities kick off the next Rainforest Alliance annual Follow the Frog campaign, which engages companies and consumers in the sustainability mission and communicates the positive impact of products that carry the Rainforest Alliance Certified seal. Martin Guitar is proud to begin its engagement with #FollowTheFrog today and will launch the 2nd phase in early 2017, when the Rainforest Alliance will commence its 30th anniversary year with full global Follow the Frog activation.As part of the campaign, Martin will chronicle the manufacturing of a guitar, certified by the Rainforest Alliance for meeting the strict standards of the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). FSC-certified guitars must comply with the most rigorous social and environmental standards on the market, including using woods from forests where ecosystems, wildlife and communities are protected.Martin Guitar’s multiple social media platforms and corporate website will allow people to #FollowTheFrog throughout the journey of the instrument’s production, from conception to the final stage of adorning it with the Rainforest Alliance Certified™ seal, featuring the organization’s iconic tree frog inside the guitar.When ready in early 2017, the finished guitar will be given to Martin Ambassador James Valentine, lead guitarist of the multi-platinum selling rock band Maroon 5, who will lead Phase 2 of the Martin Guitar #FollowTheFrog campaign, which will serve as an exciting key element of the global Rainforest Alliance Follow the Frog campaign.“Martin has been deeply committed to environmental responsibility in a variety of ways for many decades, but as the world’s premiere manufacturer of acoustic guitars, wood sustainability is of particular concern for us,” said Chris Martin IV, Chairman and CEO, Martin Guitar. “It’s important to us and it’s important to our customers that we operate in a way that ensures we will have healthy forests around the world for many generations to come. We’re proud to team up with an organization as respected as the Rainforest Alliance to help us continue to achieve this mission.”“By working with collaborating companies like Martin Guitar, who share our vision, we are able to promote the responsible management of forests to benefit communities, wildlife and the environment,” said Nigel Sizer, President of the Rainforest Alliance. “The Martin Guitar #FollowTheFrog campaign is a wonderful way for people to get an inside look at what it really means to source wood responsibly, in a way that helps people and the planet. With the global challenges of climate change and deforestation we currently face, sustainable wood sourcing has never been more important.”The first phase of the campaign will feature special messaging on both Martin Guitar’s and the Rainforest Alliance’s digital platforms, as well as informational booths hosted by the Rainforest Alliance and Martin Guitar at key music festivals. To learn more about the campaign, please visit www.martinguitar.com/followthefrog.last_img read more

Harlem Globetrotters Join US State Departments Sports Envoy Program In Lithuania And

October 16, 2019

first_imgThe Harlem Globetrotters will continue their tradition of bringing goodwill to people all over the world as part of the U.S. State Department’s Sports Envoy program this week (Sept. 20-30), when they visit Lithuania and Estonia to promote the value of teamwork in every aspect of life.These programs help bolster the United States’ cultural and social ties with the government and people of two long-standing partners and strong NATO allies.Globetrotter stars Buckets Blakes and Ace Jackson will showcase their basketball artistry and entertaining humor, while also sharing an important message about bullying prevention and character building with youth in Lithuania and Estonia through the Globetrotters’ signature programs.“It’s an honor to once again be working with the State Department to spread a message of goodwill around the world,” said Howard Smith, president of the Harlem Globetrotters. “This is something that the Globetrotters have been involved with throughout our history, spreading the message of sportsmanship, service and smiles. We’re excited to be able to bring the entertainment that the Harlem Globetrotters are known for, to new audiences in Lithuania and Estonia.”The Harlem Globetrotters have a rich history or working alongside the U.S. State Department, serving as Ambassadors of Goodwill around the globe, dating back to 1950. One of the most unforgettable moments took place on August 22, 1951 in Germany, when the Globetrotters played before 75,000 people in Berlin’s Olympic Stadium on behalf of the State Department. Olympic hero Jesse Owens accompanied the Globetrotters on that historic day, returning to the site where he had won four gold medals at the 1936 Summer Olympics. Shortly after the game, the Secretary of State, Dean Acheson, acknowledged the Harlem Globetrotters as “ambassadors of extraordinary goodwill.”Heading into their 92nd season in 2018, the Globetrotters are a uniquely American phenomenon who have introduced millions to the sport of basketball while building friendships and understanding in over 120 countries and territories on six continents. Since 2003, the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs has sent over 250 U.S. athletes to more than 85 countries on Sports Envoy programs.last_img read more

Managing fatigue in Vancouvers film industry

October 15, 2019

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement I trust some of you were able to take a few days off, get together with family and reacquaint yourself with your couch.Those of you working in the film industry could probably use the rest.That’s evident after reading through the latest dump of memos and emails posted on the city’s website from city manager Sadhu Johnston to city council. A quick stat: The city hosted 3,301 filming days in 2016, which is more than double the 1,518 days in 2015. The numbers for 2017 were expected to be equally impressive when Johnston typed up the memo in August.Johnston’s memo was based on a report authored by Jerry Dobrovolny, the city’s general manager of engineering services. Before I get to some more stats, here’s a quote from Dobrovolny to illustrate just how busy the business of making movies and television shows was/is in Vancouver.“Based on the number of applications on file and discussion with the Directors Guild of Canada BC and local film studios, location filming levels are expected to reach close to 2016 levels for the remainder of the year,” Dobrovolny said. “Should that situation materialize, the city and its industry partners will need to assess resourcing and carefully manage capacity and fatigue while providing the excellent service on which the city has built its reputation.”Did that “situation materialize?” Advertisement Facebook Login/Register With: Twitterlast_img read more

Homes for NWT

October 14, 2019

first_imgAPTN National NewsHome ownership is a dream for many families, but finding that dream home in the Northwest Territories is much harder.Houses are far more expensive there than in most cities and there are fewer available to buy.But as APTN National News reporter Wayne Rivers reports, a new project underway in Yellowknife will give several families in the territory a place to call home.last_img

Report points to more training on Aboriginal issues for Ontario teachers

October 14, 2019

first_imgJulien Gignac APTN National NewsOntario teachers do not have access to adequate training required to teach First Nations, Metis and Inuit issues, according to a new report released in the province.47 per cent of secondary schools and 29 per cent of elementary schools report they offer professional training for teachers surrounding Indigenous issues, states the People for Education’s 2015 annual report.The report included responses from 1,196 Ontario principles.Click here to read the report.The research and advocacy group’s 2014 report states that one quarter of elementary schools and roughly one-third of secondary schools have teacher training related to Aboriginal issues.However, Aboriginal students are found in 96 per cent of secondary schools and 92 per cent of elementary schools, states the latest release.“Optics are a big deal here,” said David Cameron, research director of People for Education. “It’s not so teachers can help Aboriginal kids be more successful, it’s professional development so that the entire material of the learning experience in Ontario can reflect a diverse and somewhat troubled history with a lot of peoples.“The school system is the exact place to think about this stuff,” he said. “It takes a lot of courage to do that as a teacher because it is cultural genocide.”How to do that in a mixed classroom is key, Cameron added.On June 2, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission called on all levels of government to revamp Canada’s education system as part of its 94 recommendations.A number of recommendations stressed an annual commitment to “make age-appropriate curriculum on residential schools, Treaties and Aboriginal peoples’ historical and contemporary contributions to Canada a mandatory education requirement for kindergarten to Grade 12 students.”Some circumstances are changing. The Ottawa Catholic School Board has been on a steady trajectory towards Aboriginal integration in its schools.“Our curriculum is growing all the time,” said Katie Lewis-Prieur, arts consultant and Native studies advisor for the Ottawa Catholic School Board. “We want Aboriginal studies to be embedded and across the curriculum, not just our Native studies courses.”Lewis-Prieur has seen growth in and enrollment in her courses during the last three years. There were eight secondary school classes then. Now there are 29 offered, spanning Indigenous art, history and current issues.Teachers receive a full two-years of training as part of the board’s spiritual theme, said Lewis-Prieur. “It’s a whole two years of focus where we’re talking about the residential school system and restoring relationships with our Aboriginal communities.“Our philosophy is that all students and all staff need to learn about Aboriginal issues,” she said.jgignac@aptn.calast_img read more

Kahnawake and Kanesatake team up with Quebec town to fight logging

October 14, 2019

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Mohawk of Kahnawake and Kahehsatake fear for their hunting, fishing and harvesting territory.The Quebec government issued logging permits on lands in proximity of their reserve lands several years ago and they say without consultation.The courts issued an injunction halting any logging in the area until January 2016.A local town has joined the fight.APTN’s Danielle Rochette has the story.last_img

Plan released in Montréal hopes to tackle citys social housing problems

October 14, 2019

first_imgDanielle Rochette APTN National NewsA report was released Friday in Montréal that shows the city has a lot of work to do in the area of social housing for Indigenous peoples.It was released by the friendship centre, Native Montréal.According to the report, the needs are immense – and the project’s proposal is ambitious.drochette@aptn.calast_img

PMs fight with Brazeau had the right kind of narrative Trudeau tells

October 14, 2019

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe latest edition of Rolling Stone online issued Tuesday features a full-length article on Justin Trudeau who talks about growing up with a father who was the prime minister, his rise to power and how a charity boxing match with Senator Patrick Brazeau “wasn’t random,” and that he saw it as “the right kind of narrative” for the Liberal party.At the time of the fight, Trudeau was the leader of the Liberal party with 34 seats in the house of commons.The two squared off in a cancer fundraiser match in Ottawa March of 2012.Brazeau, covered in tattoos, and sporting long black hair seemed to be the overwhelming favorite.When the bell rang, Trudeau finished Brazeau off to win the match.The Rolling Stone article suggests the match suited Trudeau and the Liberals.“It wasn’t random,” Trudeau said. “I wanted someone who would be a good foil, and we stumbled upon the scrappy tough-guy senator from an indigenous community. He fit the bill, and it was a very nice counterpoint. I saw it as the right kind of narrative, the right story to tell.”The Rolling Stone article titled, Justin Trudeau: The North Star, includes a comparison between Trudeau’s policies and that of Trump, his penchant for public appearances and how he approaches international relations.The article is hitting the news stands in August. Patrick Brazeau sent a response to the Trudeau comment on the fight. “I’ll take it as a compliment,” he wrote. Contact APTN National News here: news@aptn.calast_img read more