Cold Frames.

January 17, 2021

first_img Walter Reeves Don’t miss “Gardening in Georgia” Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 12:30 p.m. Designed especially for Georgia gardeners, the show is produced by the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and GPTV. The unpredictably cool weather this spring shows how useful a cold frame can be in protecting plants you move outside. On “Gardening in Georgia” this week, host Walter Reeves shows how to build three types of cold frames using materials you may have in your yard or storage shed.A popular gardening show in its third season on Georgia Public Television, this week’s show also covers pruning hollies and reusing hanging baskets. Reeves takes a look, too, at creeping ground cedar, watermelons and the Georgia Gold Medal winner pink Chinese loropetalum.center_img UGA CAES File Photolast_img read more

Veggie support

January 17, 2021

first_imgPeppers can be staked as well. Using similar one-inch square stakes, place them about every fourth plant with twine running from stake to stake. Start the first twine four inches above the ground. As the peppers grow, put another string about every four inches above the first. Start with the first stake and go on one side of the plants. Then go around the next stake and so on. When you get to the last stake, come back down the other side of the plants to box the plants in and keep them from falling over. For tomatoes, some people simply use wire cages to put over the plants. The plants grow and are supported by the cages. Another method is to drive a one-inch square, four-foot stake into the ground by each plant and tie the plant to the stake. By Terry KelleyUniversity of GeorgiaThe seeds have come up, the gnats are out in full force and the garden is growing. It’s time to sit back, relax and enjoy the lazy, hazy days of summer. Well, not exactly. It’s time now to trellis some of those veggies you planted. Trellising gets the plant and fruit up off of the ground, making way for better quality fruit and less disease. It also helps to maintain order in the garden and makes harvesting easier. Trellising is one chore that should be done fairly soon after plants are established. Cucumbers also grow better when trellised. You can use four-foot fencing wire and some posts to build a temporary fence beside the cucumber row. Then just train the vines up on the fence as they grow. You’ll find and pick your cukes easier.center_img Eggplant can also be staked. Tomato stakes or rebar, a common steel bar used to reinforce concrete, can be placed next to each eggplant. Then secure the plant. If you have a long row of tomatoes, you can set a large post at each end of the row and again about every 20 feet within it. Attach a wire across the top of the posts and about four inches above the ground. Use twine to tie each plant to the wires for support. Be careful not to cut into plants as you tie them with twine. But keep the twine tight enough to support the plants. Don’t forget to scout for insects and disease problems, too. Keep your weeds in check and water as needed. A gardener’s work is never quite done. But doing chores when needed will help you relax and enjoy the lazy, hazy days of summer a little more.last_img read more

10 Soil testing

January 17, 2021

first_imgBy William Terry KelleyUniversity of GeorgiaWhen garden fever hits, it’s easy to think about exciting things such as heirloom tomatoes, new varieties and the latest in garden implements. Soil testing seems to get swept under the rug as boring to most folks. That’s a big mistake. Volume XXXIINumber 1Page 10 A huge number of the problems that gardeners have each year could be resolved before they start by getting a good soil test and following the resulting recommendations.The first step in the process is taking a good sample.Sampling is really quite easy. Take a clean plastic bucket and a spade and get samples 4 to 6 inches deep in four or five places in the garden. Blend the samples well in the bucket. Then take the bucket to your county University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office and ask them to submit your soil sample.Quick feedbackIn just a few days, you’ll get a report that recommends how to fertilize your garden and whether to add some lime to adjust the soil pH. In most cases, soil pH decreases over time as we use a garden spot. You have to add lime from time to time to adjust the pH. A good soil pH for most garden crops is between 6.2 and 6.8.If your soil test results call for lime, you’ll need to apply this two to three months ahead of starting your garden to be most effective. You can apply it later, though, and still do some good. Ideally, work lime into the soil when you till the garden spot.Apply potassium and phosphorus according to the soil test recommendations. In some cases, if you’ve used extra fertilizer over the years ? as gardeners often do ? your garden soil may not even need phosphorus. You may not need much potassium, either. So when you fertilize, you may be able to use something like potassium nitrate or ammonium nitrate instead of the usual 10-10-10 analysis.Rules of thumbWhile different crops in the garden have different nitrogen requirements, you can follow some general guidelines.Heavy feeders such as cabbage, sweet corn and leafy greens will need about 5 pounds of 10-10-10 per 100 square feet. Medium feeders such as most vining crops like squash and cucumbers need about 3 pounds per 100 square feet. And light feeders like snap beans, peas and lima beans will only need about 2 pounds.If your garden has sandier soils, divide the fertilizer into an application at planting and one to two side-dressings. On heavier soils, use half at planting and half as a side-dressing.Look in your soil test results for indications of any minor nutrient deficiencies. Consult your UGA Extension county agent on how to correct these.(Terry Kelley is a Cooperative Extension vegetable horticulturist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Cell phone use

January 17, 2021

first_imgLess than 20 years ago, cell phones were considered luxury items used only in emergencies. Today, 4.1 billion people worldwide own cell phones. Most families have at least one, and often multiple, cell phones. Children often are the heaviest users of the technology. “About 75 percent of 4-H-age children have cells phones,” said Arch Smith, interim state leader of the Georgia 4-H program. “And they aren’t using them just to talk to their friends and family members.”Ninety percent use their phones to send text messages, 85 percent to take photographs, 68 percent to send photographs and 55 percent to record videos, he said.“They make 230 calls per month or eight calls per day, on average,” Smith said. “That’s nothing compared to the 1,742 text messages the average teenager types in a month.”Set boundariesEven though cell phones have become a part of everyday life, parents should set boundaries for their use both at school and at home, says Diane Bales, a human development specialist with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.“The biggest problem with cell phones is the number of students who are addicted to them,” she said. “They spend all of their time texting and not enough time listening.”Bales has seen the overuse of cell phones first hand in the college classes she teaches at UGA. “When a student texts in class, he’s not listening,” Bales said. “If he were texting about what he’s learning that would be different, but he’s probably not.” Many schools have rules about cell phone usage including setting limits on when the phones can be used, where the phones can be used and, in some cases, banning their use on school grounds entirely.“Cell phones aren’t inherently bad, kids just need guidance from teachers and parents on appropriate usage,” she said. “Texting at the dinner table is not an appropriate use.”Bales once observed a student texting on her cell phone while standing at the front of the classroom during a group presentation.“I have it spelled out in my syllabus that it’s inappropriate to text in class and that students will lose points for doing so,” she said. Multi-toolAccording to a survey by Common Sense Media, more than one out of three teenagers admits to using a cell phone to cheat at least once. They also admit to using their phone’s internet access to find answers to test questions. The survey also showed that one out of four teenagers feel accessing notes stored on a cell phone during a test isn’t cheating.“Some of the newer phones have cameras that students could use to take photo of their classmates’ test papers,” Bales said.Bales suggests teachers encourage students to use their cell phones, and other technical devices, to help them with their school work.“If a student has an iPhone, first I’m jealous, but he could use it to work on a research project,” she said. “The technology allows him to look something up on the Internet, find a good source of information and never leave the classroom or his desk.”Bales says teachers and parents should guide students to appropriate resource websites to ensure they use reliable sources of information.In this way, modern technology is being used to benefit the student and spark his interest in new media, she said.According to a survey by the Family Education Network, 85 percent of respondents feel cell phones should be allowed at school, but their usage should be controlled by school administrators.Whether a cell phone is being used at school or at home, Bales recommends having a definite list of rules and consequences for breaking the rules.Students should have a cell phone-use curfew and cell phone-free times, such as during homework hours, she said.“Teenagers have a hard time recognizing limits,” she said. “They need to be told what is appropriate and what isn’t in all aspects of their lives. Cell phone usage is just one area.”last_img read more

Renovator certification

January 17, 2021

first_imgPainters, carpenters and home renovators will benefit by attending a training Sept. 29 in Brunswick that will explain new Environmental Protection Agency regulations for lead-based paints.Offered by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension and Greenville Tech, the training will be 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. at the Glynn County Extension Office. The EPA Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule took effect April 22 and affects contractors, property managers and others who work in housing or childcare centers built before 1978.Participants will learn how to minimize lead dust generation and soil contamination during maintenance, renovation and remodeling projects. Following these procedures will reduce the risk of lead exposure to employees, children and residents.Participants in the class will perform hands-on activities and be tested at the end of the class. Those who earn a passing score will be certified as renovators, a certification that is valid for five years.The cost of the course is $260 and is limited to the first 20 registrants. For more information, or to register, go to the website www.fcs.uga.edu/ext/housing/training/lead_training.php.last_img read more

Freezing Onions

January 17, 2021

first_imgGeorgia-grown Vidalia onions have hit the grocery and farmers market shelves. Farmers have been careful to handle the crop with kid gloves during the harvest. Now, consumers have to make sure to store them properly to keep them around as long as possible, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension food safety specialist Elizabeth Andress.“While Vidalia onions are famous for their sweet flavor, there are numerous varieties and colors of onions,” Andress said. “Onions are used in many unique, flavorful condiments from relishes, salsas and pickles to jams.”For Vidalia onions that you plan to use within two to four weeks, Andress says to keep them dry and store them at room temperature in a cool, ventilated area.If you are slicing a Vidalia onion to eat fresh on a hamburger or with a big bowl of black-eyed peas, the National Onion Association says that any leftover sliced fresh onion can be safely saved for 7 days at 40 degrees Fahrenheit.Andress, who is director of the National Center for Home Food Preservation, offers the following tips on how to properly freeze onions.Peeled, washed onions can be diced or chopped and frozen without blanching. The onion should be cut into one-fourth-inch to one-half-inch pieces.If you have room in your freezer, spread the pieces out on a clean baking sheet in a single layer. When the onions are frozen (hardened), promptly remove them from the tray and package them in air-tight freezer bags or containers while they are still hard.“This keeps the pieces separated in their freezer packaging so that you will be able to remove only as much as you want at a time in the future,” Andress said. “If they are all put into the bag or container at room temperature, the onion pieces will freeze into one large mass and not as separate pieces.”Freezer bags work best for freezer storage, she said, as you can remove some of the onions and then push the air out of the bag and reseal the remaining frozen pieces. When freezing with hard containers, the air that is held in the container can affect food quality and cause freezer burn, drying out the food.For other ways to freeze onions, and for more information on preserving and canning foods, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation online at nchfp.uga.edu. You will also find many options for using onions in relishes, salsas and pickled products.According to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, Georgia farmers grew 12,417 acres of onions in 2017. The farm gate value of onions that year was over $140 million. The top onion-producing counties in Georgia are Tattnall County (4,238 acres) and Toombs County (3,750 acres).last_img read more

Healthy Landscaping

January 17, 2021

first_imgThe most important part of landscape disease management is identifying the problem. Eighty percent of all plant disorders are the result of the inability of a plant to adapt to its environment. Knowing the problem, whether it is stress related and/or disease related, begins with being able to correctly identify the plant.Identify the plants that you’re growing can clue you in to what environmental extremes the plant may or may not be able to tolerate, such as full sun, shade, drought, poor drainage, freezing, etc. Many stresses can be avoided with proper planting and maintenance. A stress-free plant is often better able to tolerate disease and insect pests.The simplest solution is often the best approach when dealing with fungal diseases in the landscape. The majority of fungicides on the market don’t provide “curative” control. In fact, most fungicides should be used preventatively and well in advance of an anticipated disease issue. Most recommendations will focus spraying fungicides on new spring growth because young, tender leaves and shoots are more susceptible to disease injury, and spring weather conditions are often ideal for fungal diseases to start — especially this year due to wet weather. Remember, once a leaf is damaged with spots or necrotic lesions, that spot is permanent until that leaf falls off the plant, no matter how much you spray. Before spraying, it is usually a good idea to prune out the worst sections and then spray to protect the rest of the plant.The location of the disease often determines the course of action. Disease issues and general control options can be lumped into three main categories: leaf diseases, stem and branch diseases, or root and vascular diseases. Leaf diseases, such as powdery mildew and fungal leaf spots, are not generally considered lethal. Plants that are otherwise healthy can tolerate significant leaf loss and will often be able to produce new leaves either midseason or next spring. As plants approach late summer or early fall, the loss of leaves is even less of a concern on deciduous plants since they will soon lose their leaves anyway.Leaf diseases are often considered an aesthetic issue and it’s important to understand that, although the problem may look unsightly, it should not kill your plants. It is true that leaf diseases are a stress factor, and, if compounded with other environmental stress issues over the course of multiple years, could lead to a more serious outcome. However, the cause of plant death is usually not due to a leaf disease alone, and any environmental stresses should be of greater concern.Stem and branch diseases can often cause more permanent damage to a plant. For example, many fungal cankers and gall-forming diseases can spread to kill entire branches or, if they spread to the main trunk, may kill the entire plant. The key with stem and branch diseases is to scout susceptible plants frequently — such as for Seiridium canker on Leyland cypress — and catch the problem early. Often, the only solution is to prune out the affected portions of the plant to limit spread. Fungicides provide little help once stem or branch diseases have formed.Root and vascular diseases such as Rhododendron wilt caused by Phytophthora, Fusarium wilt or Verticillium wilt on tomatoes are usually considered lethal diseases. These diseases kill plants either by impeding the flow of water-conducting vascular tissues inside stems or they cause roots to rot. In either case, the permanent wilt-related symptoms are the result of a fungus blocking the uptake of water. If a plant is permanently wilted and doesn’t respond to normal watering, it’s likely the result of a root-rot or vascular-stem disease. Fungicides will not cure plants infected with a vascular wilt. Often the best approach is to plant resistant varieties and to ensure plants are selected and installed according to their preference for soil moisture, sunlight, shade and drainage. With most trees and shrubs, it’s generally a good idea to plant their roots an inch or two on the high side to ensure good drainage.Remember, the best tools for disease management are proper plant selection, good maintenance practices to minimize stress, and identifying disease problems early. A good motto to follow is “if in doubt, prune it out.”  Be sure to clean pruning equipment with rubbing alcohol or a 10% bleach solution of 1 part bleach to 9 parts water when removing diseased plant material. If the problem is likely lethal to the plant and can’t be saved by pruning and minimal treatments, then apply the “if in doubt, take it out” rule to minimize spread to adjacent plants. Also, realize that some plants are inherently problematic when it comes to certain diseases — like leaf spot on red tip photinia — and an alternative plant species should be considered instead of fighting a never-ending uphill battle.For more information and free farm, lawn or garden publications, contact your local county Extension office, which can be found at extension.uga.edu/county-offices, or visit extension.uga.edu/publications.last_img read more

VERMONT AGENCY WINS TWO AWARDS

January 1, 2021

first_imgHayes Group, an integrated marketing, advertising, strategic planning and public relations firm located in Williston, Vermont has won two coveted, 2002- 2003 Golden Web Awards given by the International Association of Web Masters and Designers.The Golden Web Award is presented to those sites whose web design, originality and content have achieved levels of excellence that are deserving of recognition. Voted by the Internet’s leading IT and Web professionals, the IAWMD serves more than 135,000 members and affiliates in more than 145 countries.The Hayes Group won for its own web site: www.hayesgroup.com(link is external) and for the web site the company designed and built for Quadra-Tek, www.Quadra-Tek.com(link is external) of Arlington, Vermont. “While these awards were both a surprise,” said Matthew Hayes, president of Hayes Group, “we’re extremely pleased that the web site we created for our client, Quadra-Tek, a division of Arlington Industries, Inc., was recognized as one of the world’s best. That our own site won is a bonus. I have to admit,” Hayes smiled, “that I’m happy about winning as well.“This award confirms the validity of the global structure of the Hayes Group,” Hayes said. “Our ability to serve a client’s needs with the precise talent required is not limited to employees or geography. The Web construction firm behind these award-winning sites is in India. Concepts were developed at Hayes Group in Williston and approved by two design associates—one in Lisbon, Portugal and the other in New York City, “ Hayes added. “There is no question that the technology which now enables us to tap into a global network of talent positions Hayes Group as a creative marketing communications leader. It also enables us to provide a broader base of creativity to our Vermont clients.”last_img read more

Affordable Digital Video Productions Now Available in Vermont on DVD

January 1, 2021

first_imgArtistic Digital Sound & Photography (http://adsp.com(link is external)) announces the availablity in Vermont of affordable digital video productions released on DVD. Everything and anything from marketing messages to personal milestones can now be captured and preserved and shared for decades to come.Owner and sole-proprietor, Andre de Saint Phalle has previously produced marketing videos for the Stowe Mountain Resort as well as the Stratton Mountain Resort. For Stowe, he shot and edited an 11 minute video presenting the resort’s signature Triple A’s program, which seeks to make guests and employees cognizant of the importance of their Attitude, Awareness and Accountability. “It was a fun project to do, despite the serious nature of the content. We managed to throw in a fair amount of hi-speed thrills and spills to keep the audience from falling asleep!”Saint Phalle has also worked in TV news, independent video production as well as Hollywood feature films prior to launching Artistic Digital Sound & Photography, based in Johnson, VT.”I enjoy working with artists and professionals to help them promote their life’s work, more than anything.” Current projects in development include a DVD aimed at introducing yoga to teens, another DVD which presents a special pschotherapeutic approach to helping couples manage separations, and a craft how-to DVD on the lost art of “tatting”, a Victorian form of lace-making.”Weddings and events are also part of what I do”, adds Saint Phalle. “In Vermont you have to do alot of different things to enjoy the privilege of being 10 minutes away from places like Green River State Park!”last_img read more

Northfield Savings Bank named new Presenting Sponsor of Burlington Discover Jazz Festival

January 1, 2021

first_imgBurlington, VT December 8, 2006 Northfield Savings Bank has become the new Presenting Sponsor of the Burlington Discover Jazz Festival, Burlingtons annual 10-day community celebration. In keeping with its commitment to community, Northfield Savings Bank is helping to ensure that the Festival, a 24-year Vermont tradition, continues to enthrall Vermonters and visitors alike and serves to energize the city and local businesses. Northfield Savings Bank is proud to be able to step up our support of Vermonts largest multi-cultural event, and help continue the tradition of animating every corner of downtown Burlington with excitement offering unforgettable experiences for the entire community, said Tina de la Torre, Director of Marketing and Community Relations for Northfield Savings Bank. The changing of the guard marks a new day for the Festival, as its Founding and longtime Presenting Sponsor, the Pepsi Cola Bottling Company of Burlington, modifies its role in the celebration it helped create and nurture.  Northfield Savings Bank first became involved with the festival in 2004.We are so grateful to Pepsi for making this Festival what it is today and we look forward to Northfield Savings Bank setting the stage for its bright future, said Andrea Rogers, Executive Director of the Festival-producing Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. The Burlington Discover Jazz Festival started 24 years ago to give Vermont’s flourishing jazz community the recognition it deserved a celebration combining incredible Vermont talent with jazz legends from every corner of the globe. Produced by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, in association with Burlington City Arts, the Festival has grown throughout the years, but its mission to provide enjoyment and education through discovery of jazz in all its forms has remained constant. This years Festival will be held June 1-10, 2007 in performance spaces, parks, and outdoor venues all over town. The line-up will be announced and tickets will go on sale in mid-April, 2007. # # # About Northfield Savings BankNorthfield Savings Bank is an independent mutual organization owned by its depositors, and has been an active part of Vermont communities for nearly 140 years.  An annual dividend equal to 10% or more of profits, otherwise paid to stockholders in a public company, is invested in local communities through contributions to Vermont non-profit organizations.  NSB has assets of $516 million, employs approximately 145 people, and operates 13 branches throughout Central Vermont and Chittenden County. Web: www.discoverjazz.com(link is external)last_img read more