Extension School to host info session

March 1, 2021

first_imgHarvard Extension School will host a general information session on June 15 from 5:00 to 9 p.m. in Memorial Hall and the Science Center. The session is designed for anyone interested in learning more about the School and its offerings, which include professional degree programs and more than 600 courses in liberal arts. Registration is required.Attendees can enjoy refreshments from 5 to 6:15 p.m., while gathering information on degree programs, the School’s Alumni Association and Student Association, the Career and Academic Resource Center, and other areas. In addition, distance-learning staff members will demonstrate what it is like to take one of the School’s online courses. From 6:30 to 7:15 p.m., attendees will hear a presentation that will review reasons students choose the School to continue their studies. From 7:30 to 9 p.m., in separate sessions, representatives from the School’s diverse degree programs will talk about their curricula, discuss admission requirements, and answer questions. An additional breakout session is designed for those who are interested in taking courses only.One attendee, selected at random, will receive one tuition-free, unlimited enrollment course, to be taken during the 2011-12 academic year. Current degree candidates are not eligible for this offer.Registration is required.last_img read more

Bleary America needs some shut-eye

March 1, 2021

first_imgStop yawning, America, and get some sleep. It’s more important than you think.Studies have linked a lack of sleep to everything from higher rates of motor vehicle crashes and heart attack to the nation’s obesity and diabetes epidemics. Insufficient sleep has been linked to memory and learning troubles, behavior problems in schoolchildren, and medical mistakes by doctors and nurses.With the annual loss of an hour’s sleep coming with this weekend’s shift to daylight savings time, The Forum at Harvard School of Public Health invited a panel of experts on Tuesday to discuss the latest findings from sleep science. Numerous studies show that getting a good night’s rest not only feels good, it is a key part of living a healthy life.“A good night’s sleep is as important as exercise and diet,” said panelist Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH).Sleep provides an important break so that the brain can rest, restore, and consolidate memories, said panelist Susan Redline, Farrell Professor of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of sleep programs at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Sleep’s importance, she said, is illustrated both by the fact that all creatures seem to have a programmed need for sleep and by the fact that being deprived of sleep can be a form of torture.Human adults typically need seven or eight hours of sleep a night, teenagers nine hours, and children 12 hours. Thirty percent of adults and 70 percent of teens aren’t getting the recommended amounts, Redline said. Those regularly getting significantly less than five hours are at increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and death. Children who get too little sleep are at risk for behavior problems and academic problems.Redline and Hu were joined on the panel by Charles Czeisler, chief of the Division of Sleep Medicine at the Brigham and Baldino Professor of Sleep Medicine and director of the Division of Sleep Medicine at Harvard Medical School, and Lucian Leape, chair of the Lucian Leape Institute at the National Patient Safety Foundation and adjunct professor of health policy at HSPH. The event was moderated by Alana Elias Kornfeld, editor in chief of Healthy Living at the Huffington Post. The event was presented in collaboration with the Huffington Post.Studies have shown a close association between sleep and diet, Hu said. A lack of sleep raises levels of a hormone that increases hunger and a stress hormone that has been linked to weight gain. It has also been shown to lower levels of a hormone that reduces appetite.Results from the long-running Nurses’ Health Study, which followed 180,000 female nurses for decades, shows that nurses who are sleep-deprived have a greater tendency to ingest junk foods and soda. Over 20 years, nurses who regularly worked the night shift were shown to have a much greater risk of developing diabetes. The study, Hu said, presents a wakeup call across the country for people who work night shifts and their employers.Employers can benefit from the solution, Czeisler said. Thirty years ago, Czeisler published a study of potash harvesters who worked three shifts. They’d work seven days on one shift, then switch to an earlier shift: days, nights, evenings. In the study, they changed the schedule so that they rotated clockwise, to a later shift — which aligns better with the body’s circadian rhythms — and had the workers keep the same shift schedule for several weeks at a time, with several days off between shift changes. The result, Czeisler said, was a 20 percent increase in productivity, and inquiries to his office from hundreds of other factories.In this case, Czeisler said, the health of workers improved, but what really drew factories to the table was the increase in productivity.When it comes to sleepy children, school start times may be an unwitting culprit, said Redline and Hu. Teenagers’ body clocks appear to automatically favor staying up later, leaving less time for sleep if they have to rise for a 7:30 a.m. or 8 a.m. school start.“Kids are in first-period class when they should be in REM sleep,” Redline said.There’s growing evidence, Hu said, that a later start time would improve mood and behavior. Czeisler said the benefits might include safety as well, through a reduction in motor vehicle crashes by teens driving to school at an early hour. Twenty percent of high school juniors and seniors are getting less than five hours of sleep a night, Redline said, and those students are twice as likely to be overweight.Resistance to pushing school hours back comes from a dislike of change to teachers’ contracts, bus schedules, and parents’ need to go to work, panelists said.Today’s modern devices — from televisions to computers to cellphones — are also robbing children of sleep, panelists said. Children with televisions in their bedrooms spend on average three hours a day on recreational media, much of that at the expense of sleep.“Get technology out of the bedroom,” Hu said.Resistance to change intended to improve the nation’s health also comes from an unlikely source: the nation’s physicians. Studies have shown that long hours worked by nurses and doctors — particularly the 30-hour marathon shifts of medical residents — hurt patient care.Leape said there has been enormous resistance from the medical establishment to reforming work habits and limiting doctors and nurses to eight- or 12-hour shifts. Some steps have been taken to reduce long hours for nurses, with most hospitals limiting double eight-hour shifts, Leape said, but there’s been very little movement to reform physician hours.Physicians argue that without marathon shifts, residents won’t have time to learn everything they need, that the long hours are required to teach them about continuum of care, that shorter resident hours will mean a manpower shortage, and even simply that today’s physicians trained that way so tomorrow’s should too. Leape discounted all those arguments, pointing to Europe’s 48-hour limit on physicians’ work weeks and saying that some sample programs in the United States have functioned well.Leape said that it is unlikely that change will come from within the medical community and that it’s most likely to come at the impetus of patient advocacy groups in an effort to reduce the harm done by sleepy doctors.“The leadership has to come from the ground up,” Leape said.On Sunday and Monday, after daylight saving time’s one-hour “spring forward,” more than a billion people around the world will adjust to new sleep hours. Studies have shown that there’s a rise in motor vehicle crashes on the Monday after the time change, Czeisler said, and a 5 percent increase in heart attacks during the following week.“That’s how sensitive our biology is to time,” Czeisler said.last_img read more

Women’s tennis drops BU, 5-2

March 1, 2021

first_imgAfter dropping the doubles point, the Harvard women’s tennis team won five of the six singles matches to knock off crosstown rival Boston University, 5-2, on Friday at the Murr Center.The Crimson earned the five wins in impressive fashion, taking each match in just two sets. In doubles play, Harvard jumped out to an early advantage, as Amanda Lin and Sylvia Li topped Vivien Laszloffy and Sami Lieb, 8-4, at No. 2. But BU earned an 8-5 win at No. 3 and an 8-6 triumph at No. 1 to take the point and a 1-0 lead.It would not last long, as the Crimson cruised through the singles matches. Amy He lost just one game, defeating Lieb, 6-0, 6-1, at No. 2 to even up the match. Hannah Morrill followed suit at No. 5 with a 6-1, 6-1, decision over Kim McCallum.With momentum in its favor, Harvard continued to roll.Hideko Tachibana finished off Lauren Davis, 6-0, 6-4, in the top spot, and Crystal Yen defeated Jessi Linero, 6-3, 6-0, to give the Crimson its fourth point and the win.In the closest match of the afternoon, Li outlasted Leonie Athanasiadis, 6-4, 6-3, to make the final margin of victory three for Harvard. The following day the women defeated Binghamton University to stand at 4-3 overall. Their first Ivy League contest won’t take place until April 5 at Columbia University.View the women’s tennis schedule.last_img read more

Hofer Prize winners announced

March 1, 2021

first_img Read Full Story The 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, marked by tragedy, are also known for being the first to incorporate a brand across all aspects of the games.“The Munich games were really the first games to create a visual identity. And it was a visual and graphic identity that spoke to the new identity of West Germany,” said Matthew Gin. “This was important because it was the first games held in Germany after World War II.”Gin, a Ph.D. candidate in architecture, was this year’s first place winner in the Philip Hofer Prize for Collecting. His collection “Between West Germany and the World: Design at the 1972 Munich Olympics” was deemed outstanding by the judges who evaluated this year’s entries.The annual prize, open to all Harvard students, is named for Philip Hofer, ’21, a former curator of Houghton Library. The awards are given to students whose collection of books or works of art fulfill “the traditions of breadth, coherence and imagination” exemplified by Hofer. According to Hope Mayo, Philip Hofer Curator of Printing and Graphic Arts and one of the judges who evaluated the entries, this year’s Hofer Prize competition attracted such a strong field the judges decided to award not only a first prize of $2,000, but also two second prizes of $1,000 each, and two third prizes of $500 each.This year’s prize winners were recently recognized at a ceremony at Houghton prior to the Philip Hofer Lecture on April 16.last_img read more

Drug delivery system prevents transplant rejection

March 1, 2021

first_imgFollowing a tissue graft transplant — such as that of the face, hand, arm, or leg — it is standard for doctors to give transplant recipients immunosuppressant drugs immediately to prevent their immune systems from rejecting and attacking the new body part. However, that incurs the risk of toxicities and side effects, because suppressing the immune system can make a patient vulnerable to infection.In a global collaboration, researchers from Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in Bangalore, India, and University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland, have developed a way to deliver immunosuppressant drugs locally and when prompted, through the use of a biomaterial that self-assembles into a hydrogel, a gelatinlike material. The novel system is able to targeted and controlled release of the medication, so that it is delivered where and when it is needed.The study was published online today in Science Translational Medicine.The hydrogel-drug combo, which contains the immunosuppressant drug tacrolimus, is injected under the skin after transplant surgery. The hydrogel remains inactive until it detects an inflammation/immune response from the transplant site, at which point it delivers the immunosuppressant drug within the transplanted graft for months.In pre-clinical studies conducted by the researchers, a one-time, local injection of the hydrogel-drug combo prevented graft rejection for more than 100 days. This compared with 35.5 days for recipients receiving only tacrolimus, and 11 days for recipients without treatment or only receiving hydrogel.The innovation may also be applied in medical situations outside of transplant surgery.“This new approach to delivering immunosuppressant therapy suggests that local delivery of the drug to the grafted tissue has benefits in reducing toxicity, as well as markedly improving therapeutic outcomes, and may lead to a paradigm shift in clinical immunosuppressive therapy in transplant surgery,” said Harvard Medical School associate professor of medicine Jeff Karp, Division of Biomedical Engineering, BWH Department of Medicine, co-corresponding study author.Inflammation-directed drug release offers judicious use of a locally injected drug that extends the release for months while eliminating systemic toxicity, added Robert Rieben, associate professor of transplantation immunology, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, co-corresponding study author. “Continuous release of the drugs irrespective of disease severity is a hallmark of existing drug delivery vehicles and could be a thing of the past.”“This safe, controlled release platform approach functions for over three months from a single injection, and that has broad implications,” said Karp. “Nearly every disease has an inflammatory component. Thus we believe the materials we have developed could be used for localized treatment of multiple inflammatory diseases.”Added Praveen Kumar Vemula, co-corresponding study author: “This approach should also improve patient compliance, as it obviates the need for daily medications. Also, we plan to expand this prototype for the treatment of numerous diseases such as psoriasis, arthritis, and cancer.” Vemula, now affiliated with the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in Bangalore, India, developed the hydrogel with Karp while a postdoc in the Karp laboratory.This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health, American Society for Surgery of the Hand, Olga Mayenfisch Foundation, Julia Bangerter-Rhyner Foundation, and a Harvard Institute of Translational Immunology/Helmsley Trust Pilot Grant.Karp is a founder of, and has a financial interest in, Skintifique, a company that is developing self-assembled hydrogels for skin applications. The Karp lab developed the hydrogel technology and it was licensed by BWH to Skintifique.last_img read more

A ‘sitdown’ with Snowden

March 1, 2021

first_imgThe new documentary “Citizenfour” centers on a series of candid interviews with Edward Snowden, the former Central Intelligence Agency employee and National Security Agency (NSA) contractor who last year leaked more than 200,000 classified documents about sweeping U.S. surveillance efforts.The film’s action unfolds in a Hong Kong hotel room over eight days, during which Snowden’s revelations about the vast scope of the surveillance programs hit the press. On Monday afternoon, via videoconference, Harvard Law School’s Lawrence Lessig engaged Snowden in another frank conversation.A whistleblower to some, a spy to others, Snowden has been living in exile in Russia for the past year to avoid U.S. espionage charges. For an hour on Monday, he offered listeners a window into his motivations and his thoughts on the national security landscape.Snowden’s actions sparked a global debate about privacy versus national security concerns, a debate that he thinks was desperately needed. U.S. intelligence agencies, he said, were working without oversight, “changing the boundaries of the rights that we enjoy as free people and a free society.” Snowden said that Congress, the courts, and the executive branch of government “had failed” to do anything about the vast expansion of surveillance, either because they were unaware or unwilling.“This led me to stand up and say something,” he said.The U.S. government considers Snowden a fugitive from justice. Last year, prosecutors filed a criminal complaint against him, charging him with theft, unauthorized communication of national defense information, and willful communication of classified communications intelligence information to an unauthorized person.During his discussion with Lessig, Snowden touched briefly on his background. His grandfather and father were in the military, and his mother and sister still work for the government. He decided to enlist in the U.S. Army, inspired in response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11. He said he later began his intelligence work confident that the government for the most part “did good things and did them for the right reasons.”But he said his perspective shifted as his career progressed, first at the CIA, and later with the NSA as he gained “an increasingly concerning understanding of what happens on the broad scale.” According to Snowden, senior officials in the intelligence community had “become less accountable to the public,” overseeing “programs of mass surveillance that were happening beyond any possible statutory authority.”When he raised his concerns internally “they got nowhere,” said Snowden. He reached out to the press as a last resort, adding that he “never published anything.” Instead he let the press decide whether to publish information and thus allow the public “to participate in the democratic process in order to claim their part in determining the outcome.”After a failed attempt to reach former lawyer and journalist Glenn Greenwald, Snowden contacted Laura Poitras, through a series of encrypted emails in January 2013. At Snowden’s urging, Poitras connected with Greenwald, and together the pair broke the first surveillance story in The Guardian US that June. (Poitras would go on to make the documentary.) Soon after the first story, Washington Post reporter Barton Gellman released a series of articles based on Snowden’s information. Earlier this year, both news outlets were awarded the Pulitzer Prize for public service.The Pulitzer win proved “this kind of investment,” said Snowden, “is important to the quality of our society.”Why didn’t he go to The New York Times? wondered Lessig, Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership. Snowden said he wanted to reach a variety of outlets to ensure his information would get out without interference from the U.S. government. Many U.S. newspapers are too institutionalized, hierarchal, and rigid, he argued. He said that the Times, which delayed publishing a 2005 story about the Bush administration’s warrantless wiretapping program for a year at the urging of the White House, “has a history of sitting on stories of massive public importance.”During his intelligence work, Snowden said he noticed a critical pivot away from targeted surveillance toward programs that collected mass amounts of data. He called that shift costly and ineffective, a “collect-all” strategy that makes it impossible to keep a close eye on targets that warrant closer attention.“A good example of this is actually the Boston Marathon bombings,” said Snowden. The Russian intelligence services had made the Tsarnaev brothers known to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, he said, but the FBI only conducted “a cursory investigation.”“The reality is we knew who these guys were, and we knew they were associated with extremism in advance of these attacks, but we didn’t follow up. We didn’t keep watching these guys. And the question is: Why? I believe the reality of that is because we do have finite resources. And the question is: Should we be spending $10 billion a year on mass surveillance programs at the NSA to the extent that we no longer have effective means of traditional, targeted surveillance?”When he had a security clearance he classified as “greater than top secret,” Snowden said he could have done considerable harm if he so chose. But he said his first rule when speaking with the press was that they “do no harm” and only publish stories “with clear public-interest justification.”Lessig asked if Snowden would consider making himself “available to the ordinary criminal process.”“There is no due process for whistleblowers in the intelligence community,” and American defendants are banned from making a public-interest defense before a jury, Snowden said. He said that the U.S. Espionage Act, which is “intended for the prosecution of spies, is being increasingly leveraged to be used as sort of a bludgeon against public-interest journalistic sources and whistleblowers.”Lawrence Lessig interviews Edward Snowden HLS Professor Lawrence Lessig interviewed Edward Snowden at Harvard Law School on Oct. 20. <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_Sr96TFQQE” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/o_Sr96TFQQE/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a>last_img read more

American Academy elects new members

March 1, 2021

first_imgThe American Academy of Arts and Sciences today announced the election of 197 new members. They include some of the world’s most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, and artists, and civic, business, and philanthropic leaders.Those elected from Harvard are Marcia Angell, senior lecturer in social medicine, Harvard Medical School (HMS); Thomas B.F. Cummins, Dumbarton Oaks Professor of the History of Pre-Columbian and Colonial Latin American Arts; Peter T. Ellison, John Cowles Professor of Anthropology; Noah R. Feldman, Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law, Harvard Law School; Roland G. Fryer Jr., Henry Lee Professor of Economics; David D. Ginty, Edward R. and Anne G. Lefler Professor of Neurobiology, HMS, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator; Paul L. Harris, Victor S. Thomas Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education; James Kloppenberg, Charles Warren Professor of American History; Margaret S. Livingstone, Takeda Professor of Neurobiology, HMS; and Gerhard Wagner, Elkan Rogers Blout Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, HMS.One of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies, the American Academy is also a leading center for independent policy research. Members contribute to academy publications and studies of science and technology policy, global security and international affairs, social policy and American institutions, and the humanities, arts, and education.Read about the members.last_img read more

Women’s contribution to health care nearly 5% of global GDP

March 1, 2021

first_img Read Full Story A groundbreaking new report on women and health has found that women are contributing roughly $3 trillion to global health care, but that nearly half of this work—2.35% of global GDP—is unpaid and unrecognized.The June 5, 2015 Lancet report, issued by the Commission on Women and Health, is being launched the same day at a symposium at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The report offers one of the most exhaustive analyses to date of the evidence surrounding the complex relationships between women and health, and demonstrates that women’s distinctive contribution to society is under-recognized and undervalued—economically, socially, politically, and culturally. It examines women’s health needs as well as their critical roles as members of the health workforce and caregivers in their families and communities, and makes recommendations to advance the women and health agenda.The Commission on Women and Health, co-chaired by Ana Langer, professor of the practice of public health and director of the Women and Health Initiative and Maternal Health Task Force at Harvard Chan School, is a partnership between The Lancet, the Women and Health Initiative, and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. Other Harvard-affiliated faculty who served as commissioners and authors on the report included Dean Julio Frenk and Professor of Global Health Systems Rifat Atun, both from Harvard Chan School, and Felicia Knaul, associate professor at Harvard Medical School.last_img read more

Dramatic chain of events

March 1, 2021

first_imgDark matter: The world’s brightest physicists know it’s there, but can’t say for sure what it is.It is invisible, mysterious, and to most people — irrelevant to everyday life. But what if it could reach out and touch us? What if it already has, and so deeply that it just might be responsible for putting us here?One Harvard physicist is exploring that idea, and pondering the possibility that dark matter may have triggered the most famous cosmic collision ever — the one that did in the dinosaurs and opened the way for mammals to take their place.Theoretical physicist Lisa Randall, the Frank B. Baird Jr. Professor of Science, sees intriguing lines of evidence that tie dark matter to comets in the solar system’s distant Oort cloud, and from there to the 66-million-year-old impact crater on Mexico’s Yucatán coast.Randall first explored the idea last year in an article, co-authored with Assistant Professor of Physics Matthew Reece, in the journal Physical Review Letters. Inspired by the intricate chain linking dark matter, Earth, dinosaurs, and modern life, Randall decided to take a deep dive into the subject for her new book, “Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs: The Astounding Interconnectedness of the Universe.”“I was just fascinated by this story,” Randall said. “It was really nice for me to be able to communicate about dark matter through its potential connections to what we see today.”The book, to be published Oct. 27, takes the reader on a tour of the universe, from the Big Bang to today, from the story of life to mass extinctions, from the distant galactic disk to Earth’s K-T boundary layer — a thin, globe-spanning blanket of dust that scientists believe is evidence of the cataclysmic impact that ended the dinosaurs’ reign.The book suggests that a thin disk of dark matter could have influenced weakly bound comets in the outer regions of the solar system as it revolved around the center of the Milky Way, and may have been the ultimate cause of the impact. Randall admits that the disk hasn’t been found, but said that current data allows for it, and that instruments that might detect it aren’t far off.Randall makes liberal use of anecdotes and analogies to explain complex scientific ideas. We learn something about Randall, too: She skis, has a robot that vacuums her floors, and was once taken not for a cosmologist — one who studies the universe’s broad structure — but a cosmetologist.The dinosaurs’ demise is a dramatic example of connectedness. Scientists are reasonably sure the killer made an enormous impact, though there’s some question whether it was from a rocky asteroid that would have originated within the solar system or a comet originating at its far fringe, in a vast assemblage of icy bodies called the Oort cloud, far beyond the orbit of Pluto.If the dinosaur killer was a comet, the next question is, what gave it the initial push toward Earth? Scientists confronting that question have an additional clue: The impact that caused the dinosaurs’ extinction wasn’t the only one in the planet’s history. There have been several, in fact, and there’s some evidence that they occur at regular — at least on a galactic scale — intervals of between 30 million and 35 million years.The Oort cloud is so far away and the time scales involved so vast that investigators have sought answers outside the solar system, which circles the galactic center every 240 million years or so, moving up and down through the flattened plane of the galaxy as it does. Some researchers have explored whether that passage could possibly bump a comet onto a collision course with Earth, but the band of visible matter in the galactic disk is diffuse enough that the collisions it would trigger don’t match the timing of those on Earth.This is where dark matter comes in.While dark matter is invisible, it isn’t completely undetectable. All matter exerts a gravitational pull, and it is through dark matter’s gravitational effects on visible objects in the universe that scientists know it’s there.Unlike visible matter, however, dark matter isn’t concentrated in the galactic disk. It is thought to be spread in a sphere around the galactic center that extends well above and below the concentration of stars and other ordinary matter.But what if, Randall asked, there were more than one kind of dark matter? After all, there are many kinds of visible matter, and there’s a lot more dark matter than visible matter. Scientists estimate that 85 percent of all matter in the universe is dark, so why should it all be one kind?If there is a dark particle that is able to emit energy, as ordinary matter does, it would cool and condense, naturally forming a rotating disk around the galactic center. The hypothesized size of dark-matter particles — about 100 times larger than a proton — would create a disk up to 100 times thinner and 20 times denser than one created by visible matter, thin enough that the collision timing would match.“Suppose dark matter had its own photon,” Randall said. “It could radiate and form a disk and the consequences could be very interesting.”Randall, whose past work has dealt with concepts such as supersymmetry and extra dimensions, said that apart from research, educating the public about science is a high priority. Her three previous books were aimed at a general audience, and she’s worked in music, as well, writing the text for an opera based on her study of extra dimensions.To Randall, the story of the dinosaur impact — one of five known mass extinctions — resonates today in disturbing ways.“It’s so important to understand history,” Randall said. “There’s a sixth extinction going on. We’re losing so many species on this planet.”This sixth extinction is a product of human activity. If readers of “Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs” take away nothing else, Randall said, she hopes they gain an understanding of just how interconnected elements of the universe can be, and how strongly humans are linked to non-human life on the planet.last_img read more

Plácido Domingo in conversation at Harvard

March 1, 2021

first_imgLegendary opera singer Plácido Domingo will be celebrated at Harvard with “Giving Voice: A Conversation with Plácido Domingo” on Thursday, April 14, 2016 at 4 p.m. at Sanders Theatre, 45 Quincy St., moderated by Tamar Herzog, Monroe Gutman Professor of Latin American Affairs and professor of Spanish and Portuguese history, and Anne Shreffler, James Edward Ditson Professor of Music.Presented by the Division of Arts and Humanities, Office for the Arts at Harvard, and Intituto Cervantes Observatory of the Spanish Language in the U.S., this event is open to the public. Admission is free with tickets required, limit of two tickets per person. Tickets are available to students (of any college) and Harvard affiliates beginning Tuesday, April 5, and to the general public beginning Wednesday, April 6, through the Harvard Box Office, Farkas Hall, 10 Holyoke St., 617.496.2222. As of April 6, tickets are also available online (handling fees apply for online and phone orders).Plácido Domingo has sung 147 opera roles and has given more than 3,600 career performances. His repertoire spans the gamut from Mozart to Verdi and Berlioz to Puccini. He performs in every important opera house in the world and has made more than 100 recordings of complete operas, compilations of arias and duets, and crossover discs. He has won 13 Grammy Awards and has made more than 50 music videos.Domingo is the former general director of Washington National Opera; currently he is the Eli and Edythe Broad General Director of Los Angeles Opera, which, under his guidance, has become one of America’s most significant opera ensembles.last_img read more